Technology – Ideas in Motion

On this page, I post thoughts about technology, context awareness and predictive analytics. You can find out about my career in technology or my writing here as well. (Today, I am a proud Intel employee, and my employer is not accountable or liable for my opinions.)

 

Recent Blog Posts on these topics: 

Inventing the Future: Everything Old is New Again (iPhone 6S edition)

Posted by on Sep 14, 2015 in tech, technology | 0 comments

I’ve been really excited to see new innovations in interaction with phone, mobile device and wearable interfaces lately. Some of these innovations are doubly exciting…. because I helped invent them, seven years ago, and these new ways of interacting with data and with devices are only now coming to the mass market. For example, it was fascinating to have Walt Mossberg trumpet the praises of the iPhone 6S this week at Apple’s launch event. Here’s what Mossberg said: Anyone who thought there was no more fundamental innovation to be wrung out of the smartphone is just wrong. The 10-finger multi-touch interface made mainstream by the iPhone 8 years ago has now taken a leap forward with Apple’s 3D Touch. This lets you view content in apps without opening them, quickly perform common actions, and generally manage your smartphone more smoothly by simply pressing a bit harder than usual on the screen. In brief use so far, I found this both highly useful and delightful — exactly the reactions Apple loves best. I expect to use it many times a day. Exactly right. And my stellar team at Vulcan Labs (under the Kiha/ARO product name) invented most of these user experience innovations…. six or even seven years ago. You see, innovations like this don’t emerge one time or in one place. They percolate around the edges — and in the Labs — of various teams of collaborators for many years before finally, someone gets the budget, the right partners, and the clout to bring them to market in a fully productized and completed product. Here are some examples: Flipper of multiple “Tabs” in Apple iOS Safari   “Force Touch” / 3D Touch to expose contextually relevant menus   Smart contextual information based on in-line text recognition Let’s go thru the details on these “new” innovations, point by point. 1) Flipper of multiple “Tabs” in Apple iOS Safari (You might note that I went to Whitworth for my undergraduate degree… guess who got to write the copy for the Flipper?) Right now, they are using this only on browser pages on the on-device Safari browser. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if they eventually got around to our implementation model, where every recent app on the device can be browsed in this flip-book fashion.Here’s the Apple version, side by side with our original version, as available in press ready presentations since 2009 or thereabouts.   2) “Force Touch” / 3D Touch to expose contextually relevant menus Imagine that you could touch LONGER in a certain place on the screen, or have the device recognize that you needed information relevant to that place on your screen or your text. Well, we did that. In 2009. Happy to see it in broad production on an Apple iPhone 6S in 2015.             3) Smart contextual information based on in-line text recognition   Imagine that your device might know where on your screen or where in your text you were, and provide contextually relevant information, as a blossoming “menu” available at a touch. Yes, we did that, in 2009. Happy to see it on the iPhone 6S in 2015. I’m very happy to have been part of extremely collaborative and innovative teams at Vulcan Labs and Xerox PARC who invented many ideas similar to those...

read more

IDF 2015 (Intel)

Posted by on Aug 21, 2015 in context awareness, Intel, tech, technology | 0 comments

Intel created an awesome week with at IDF 2015, Aug 18-20. We had a fantastic session with the new Intel® Context Sensing SDK for Windows – newly released this week. Here’s a great short summary video of all the fun at IDF 2015! Coverage includes announcements from this years Intel Developer Forum: Intel® RealSense™ technology extends into new platforms and devices; ‘America’s Greatest Makers’ reality competition announced, premiering in 2016; 3D XPoint™ comes to storage and memory solutions with Intel® Optane™ Technology, and much more. Visit http://www.intel.com/newsroom/idf for more. Please like &...

read more

Ned Hayes – Media Reel

Posted by on Jul 25, 2015 in Intel, tech, technology | 0 comments

NED HAYES Market Strategist, Futurist, Author   Media Reel includes excerpts from interviews as a core product leader at Intel, Xerox PARC, and excerpts from author interviews with BookNote, as well as a reading at Rainier Writing Workshop 2015.       Please like &...

read more

Intel in Shenzhen – Context Sensing SDK

Posted by on Apr 3, 2015 in context awareness, Intel, tech, technology | 0 comments

Intel in Shenzhen – Context Sensing SDK

I’m very proud of what my smart team at Intel has accomplished over the last year, and I’m excited to see our tools demonstrated at the Intel Developer’s Forum (IDF) in Shenzhen 2015 this week in China. Our team has delivered a useful set of context-aware tools that can be seen in several games and Android apps on the show floor at IDF Shenzhen 2015. You can get the “Intel Context Sensing SDK” toolset here: http://contextsensing.intel.com/ And here’s some more information about the Intel Context Sensing SDK. Context Sensing SDK surfaces the power of Intel’s sensor hub and advanced sensor capabilities to power mobile and Web apps, thru standard RESTful APIs, dynamic algorithms and state machines, married to Intel’s next-generation Intel Integrated Sensor Solution for Android, with all your data aggregated to a world-class Mashery-managed cloud service. Context Sensing SDK is an Android library that helps you easily incorporate services and context aware capabilities in your Android applications. The SDK is flexible, offering several methods to use the services, either independently or in combination. The SDK includes Context APIs, which are useful to create context aware applications by taking advantage of many built-in context types providers. What is more, the SDK includes a Rules Engine that enables you to create rules based on the context and trigger actions once the conditions are met. You can download and use the Intel Context Sensing SDK here >>     Please like &...

read more

Runcible – Monohm at MWC 2015

Posted by on Mar 4, 2015 in context awareness, geekdad, Intel, lifehack, software, tech, technology | 0 comments

Runcible – Monohm at MWC 2015

I am so impressed with the craftsmanship and creativity shown by the Monohm team with their new “heirloom device,” the Runcible. Even in the first generation of this smartphone, the device no longer feels like a technological interloper on your life. Instead it feels like a natural part of your daily wardrobe, part of your life, and part of your family experience. This is what a “next generation wearable device” should feel like: it should be organic and beautiful. The Runcible device is a round smartphone that fits readily in your pocket, is crafted with care (both software and hardware), and delivers a personalized experience that does not interrupt your life, but instead accentuates what you really care about in your daily experience. I cannot wait to become an early adopter of this remarkable device. (with thanks to my old colleague George Arriola for being part of the team that developed this break-through device!) Pictures from my hands-on moments with the Runcible device at Mobile World Congress 2015.  Please like &...

read more

Mobile World Congress 2015

Posted by on Mar 4, 2015 in context awareness, Intel, tech, technology | 0 comments

Mobile World Congress 2015

A few photos from my recent week-long demo adventure to support Intel’s Context Sensing SDK and Integrated Developer Experience at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona (March 2015). Please like &...

read more

Trains, planes and Seattle supercommuters

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in geekdad, lifehack, tech | 0 comments

FLASHBACK — TWO YEARS AGO… This is an interesting article in Seattle Times written about my commute to California, when I was working for Xerox PARC in Palo Alto.   May 18, 2012 at 1:00 AM Trains, planes and Seattle supercommuters By Lora Shinn / Special to NWjobs For two years, technology product manager Ned Hayes would rise before the sun at 4 a.m. every Monday to drive to SeaTac airport from his home in Olympia. He would hop a flight to San Jose, Calif., and arrive at his workplace in Palo Alto just in time for the weekly 9:30 a.m. team meeting. To stay in touch with his family, Hayes read books to his two children over video chat and spoke with his wife using Skype. He returned home on Wednesday or Thursday night in time for dinner. Despite the difficulty, Hayes says this ultra-long-distance haul was still easier than when he commuted from Olympia into Seattle daily for a previous job. “I got better sleep when I wasn’t getting up at 5 a.m. every single day for the back-and-forth drive to Seattle,” he says. Enter the rise of the supercommuter: an employee who works in a metro area but lives beyond the boundaries of that area, requiring a commute into the workplace via air, rail, car, bus or combination of modes. That’s according to the New York University Wagner School of Public Service, which produced a 2012 paper on supercommuting trends. Supercommuting to King County King County, the center of the Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia statistical area, had the third-fastest rate of growth in supercommuting in the country from 2002-09, behind Houston and Los Angeles. The top areas of residences and number of supercommuters to King County: Portland: 12,900 Spokane: 7,700 Bellingham: 6,700 Yakima: 5,300 Kennewick: 4,800 Source: New York University Wagner School of Public Service As the report states, “supercommuters are well positioned to take advantage of higher salaries in one region and lower housing costs in another.” In a tight labor market and difficult housing climate, it may not be possible to sell a house or simply find another job. King County is noted as a region with 71,000 supercommuters, among the top five U.S. counties with a high rate of supercommuter growth. From 2002 to 2009, Yakima to Seattle alone saw a 131 percent increase in supercommutes (an additional 3,000 commutes). How best to manage a long-distance commute? There are several approaches, says Terry Pile, a Seattle-based career adviser. She knows an employee of the University of Washington who lives in the Darrington area but keeps a small apartment near the university instead of wrangling up to 90 miles of traffic each way. Similarly, Aaron Tinling lives in Port Townsend and commutes into Redmond every week to work at a large software company. Tinling eventually rented a room in a Redmond house for his four-day shift to cut down on the two- to three-hour drive (each way) required for work. Other supercommuters may ask for a compressed work week, like Hayes. “It depends on the job, but you can also ask to telecommute for a day or two,” Pile says. Take advantage of the time during the commute, Hayes suggests, whether it’s reading, working or catching up on sleep that may be cut short by long-distance commutes. Tasks that stretch your creativity can be accomplished during the commute,...

read more

Interesting Amazon Royalty Calculator

Posted by on Oct 16, 2014 in publishing, tech, technology | 0 comments

Here’s a great royalty calculator for authors and people considering going indie with their next book. Please like &...

read more

Video of Context SDK Launch at Intel Developer Forum

Posted by on Sep 11, 2014 in context awareness, Intel, tech, technology | 0 comments

Ned Hayes presents Intel Context Sensing SDK at IDF 2014 — with Intel VP Doug Fisher.   Please like &...

read more

Context SDK at IDF14 – Intel Developer Forum

Posted by on Sep 9, 2014 in context awareness, Intel, tech, technology | 0 comments

I was able to present my team’s fantastic new product — the Intel Context Sensing SDK — at the Intel Developer’s Forum (IDF14) today!   Here’s the livestream and webcast of the IDF14 Event Keynote >>    Here’s where you can get the Intel Context Sensing SDK, and here are some pictures!       Please like &...

read more

Enjoy what you read? Share!