Coeur d’Alene Waters

CDW_frontCOEUR D’ALENE, IDAHO, is where people go to hide. 

Neo-Nazis. 

Corrupt politicians. 

Mining men with buried secrets.

In 1972, ninety-one men were killed in a mining ”accident” sparked by a fire lit nearly a mile underground: the mystery was never solved. After the rest escaped, only three miners survived underground.

More than twenty years later, Matt Worthson is a sheriff’s lieutenant and the disgraced son of mining hero and Sunshine Mine survivor Stanley Worthson. Matt expects to finish out his years on the force in quiet ignominy. But when the gruesomely dismembered body of a police chaplain is found at the swanky Coeur d’Alene Resort, Matt is tapped to find the murderer.

As Matt investigates the murder of his friend, he finds himself digging deep into the labyrinth of lies that seeps beneath the Coeur d’Alene region, including the Sunshine Mine disaster, and the truth behind his own broken family.

COEUR D’ALENE WATERS


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COEUR D’ALENE WATERS

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The Eagle Tree — 2016 Novel

Posted by on Oct 21, 2015 in amwriting, books, writing | 2 comments

THE EAGLE TREE is now available from your local bookstores (Indies first!),  Amazon and Barnes & Noble.           THE EAGLE TREE is published by Little A. Thank you to all my early readers for your support and encouragement! Endorsed by Steve Silberman, Temple Grandin, Francisco X. Stork and Susan Senator, The Eagle Tree will appeal to readers who enjoyed Mark Haddon’s award-winning Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time or Jim Lynch’s The Highest Tide.  Fourteen-year-old March Wong knows everything there is to know about trees. They are his passion and his obsession, even after his recent fall—and despite social services’ threat to take him away from his mother if she doesn’t keep him out of their branches. But the young autistic boy just cannot resist the captivating pull of the Pacific Northwest’s lush forests just outside his backdoor. One day, March is devastated to learn that the Eagle Tree—a monolithic Ponderosa pine near his home in Olympia—is slated to be cut down by developers. Now, he will do anything in his power to save this beloved tree, including enlisting unlikely support from relatives, classmates, and even his bitter neighbor. In taking a stand, March will come face-to-face with some frightening possibilities: Even if he manages to save the Eagle Tree, is he risking himself and his mother to do it? Intertwining themes of humanity and ecology, The Eagle Tree eloquently explores what it means to be a part of a family, a society, and the natural world that surrounds and connects us. A literary update from NedNote.com Readers can find my books at these bookstores: To read more of my writing, you can visit NedNote.com. Get literary updates by subscribing to my quarterly newsletter:  Please like &...

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Where And How I Write

Posted by on Jun 4, 2015 in amwriting, books, writing | 0 comments

I read something today that really surprised me. The brilliant Kris Rusch wrote that some writers cannot write on planes. This surprised me, because I’ve never been one of those writers who just writes in a certain location or a certain environment. Sure, it’s tempting to be one of those “special snowflake” writers, but I wouldn’t get near enough writing done if I chose that route. Out of that thought, I thought I’d chart my own route. I thought I’d make a small list of the places and times I’ve written, just for my own amusement.    Here’s the List of how I write: Writing via different mediums (I write in notebooks, by hand, in pen and pencil. My most recent complete novel was hand-written before being typed in. I also write on various software products on Windows laptops, Mac laptops, and via audio-dictation on my phone and tablets. I’m not religious about what tools I use, but I am religious about writing every day.) Writing with different instruments (I’ve written whole notebooks that are full of a scribbled mass of fiction composed with ballpoint pens, fountain pens, pencils, felt-tip pens and even a few crayon paragraphs when I couldn’t find a working pen. I’ve composed on torn scraps of paper, newspaper margins, magazines, the backs of old books, and even on restaurant napkins — oh, and occasionally, I buy a fresh clean notebook for this purpose. Typically the cheapest available.) I met a writer who actually would not write unless they had their special leather-covered notebook and a fountain pen. I was wholly under-whelmed: I mean, how do you get any writing done, if you need special equipment? It’s not like rock-climbing. No one will die if you write with a pencil, my friend. Writing around the clock (I’ve written at all the following times: 7-10 a.m., lunch time 11:30-1 pm, afternoon 3-6 pm, thru dinner 6-8 pm, after dinner and bedtime writing 8 pm – 12 am, late night writing 12-3 a.m., early morning writing, 4:30 am-7 am. The longest I’ve ever written one one stretch of 16 hours. The shortest is about 10 minutes at a concert once.) Writing in different postures (I’ve written while standing up, while sitting at my desk, while lying down. I wrote a thought down once while riding a bicycle, but I’ve never managed to write while running.) Writing at different furniture (I often write at my jerry-rigged standing desk in my home office. But I have also written sitting down in my chair, and at my kitchen counter, on the couch while hanging out with my children, in the backyard on the lawn, beside the pool at a pool party, and on top of a wine barrel at a crowded party full of people.) Writing while driving (When I drive, I write 99% thru audio-dictation on a hands-free headphone/microphone, and just recently I crossed the 20K line written by audio-dictation to my phone. Only occasionally, have i hand-written a quick thought by hand on paper while driving) Writing every day of the week (Yes, I’ve written Mon-Fri and Sat and Sun. I’ve written during work days, and right thru a vacation (finished a book on vacation) Writing at Home (I’ve written in every room in my house, including the kitchen and...

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New Interview on TCTV – Public Television (Youth Programming)

Posted by on Feb 22, 2015 in books, reading, sinfulfolk, writing | 0 comments

Thanks to TCTV for hosting me on their public affairs programming. Appreciate the good questions from the youth who interviewed me!   A literary update from NedNote.com Readers can find my books at these bookstores: To read more of my writing, you can visit NedNote.com. Get literary updates by subscribing to my quarterly newsletter:  Please like &...

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Advertising for Indie Writers (Amazon KDP Select)

Posted by on Feb 1, 2015 in books, publishing | 0 comments

Amazon always seems to be adding new innovations targeted at giving indie publishers, small presses and authors more power over how their books appear and how their books are marketed to the reading public. I’m a hybrid author, with books published by traditional publishers, as well as short stories and books self-published (under a pseudonym). So I get to see what tools legacy publishers are providing, as well as what self-publishing options exist. I was surprised to discover this week that Amazon has added a new “Promote and Advertise” option on the bookshelf for self-published authors. I don’t know if this same facility is available yet to small presses — I imagine that larger publishers have always had “placement” or “pay to play” options available to them at large buy-in amounts (ie. $50K-100K per placement). However, the buy-in for the Amazon self-publishing option is only $100, which seems to me to be quite reasonable. I’m trying it out on one book, and I’ll update this post as soon as I receive results from this and discover how useful it can be to authors or small publishers.   In this post, I’ll cover the basics. First, as should be expected by now, this option is ONLY available (at least in the self-publishing world) to KDP Select books — if your book is not Kindle Select, then you won’t be able to use this advertising and promotional option. Amazon provides this helpful explanation of exactly where an advertisement will be shown, and what the placement and audience interest items mean: First, you’ll find this option under the “Bookshelf” area, where all your books are listed. Click through to your “Bookshelf”, where you can see the option listed under KDP Select as “Promotion and Advertising” (this also implies that Amazon may add additional advertising functions in the future, accessible through this area.) Amazon also views this promotion / advertisement option as a natural pairing with their existing price promotional discounts, so this is now married to that option on a single page:  On this page, you select one book to advertise. What’s interesting about this is that you can’t (yet) choose to advertise a complete series or a set of books by an author, or a forthcoming or “advance order” book on this page. You can only choose books that have been previously published, and that are generally available through KDP. Books that appear on this list which are published elsewhere (like my book Glossolalia) will show up on the list, but will be labeled “Ineligible” — Select an eligible book and move to the next step. Once you select an eligible KDP Select book, then you can choose two options for Ad Targeting. The first is “By Product” and the second is “By Interest.” I’m testing both — and I will update this post when I have some results on how both perform. I’ve drilled into both of them, and here’s how they work.   First, if you select “by Product” then you can choose other (usually comparable or similar) products to have your book show up alongside. For example, if you write zombie fiction (like this short story) then you might want your book to show up on the product pages for  “Walking Dead” or “Night of the Living Dead.” Alternatively, if you write...

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New Interview on WMKT News Radio

Posted by on Jan 30, 2015 in amwriting, books | 0 comments

New radio interview on WMKT Michigan Radio with Vic McCarty. Seahawks, Patriots and the Middle Ages!   http://wmktthetalkstation.com/media/podcasts/vic/01-27-15%20%20ned%20hayes%20sinful%20folk.mp3     A literary update from NedNote.com Readers can find my books at these bookstores: To read more of my writing, you can visit NedNote.com. Get literary updates by subscribing to my quarterly newsletter:  Please like &...

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Great letter from JFK

Posted by on Dec 24, 2014 in reading | 0 comments

Great letter from John F. Kennedy to a little girl who was concerned about Santa Claus during the Cold War. #JFK #Christmas #MerryChristmas Please like &...

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The Monument – for Veteran’s Day

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in books, writing | 0 comments

New story from Nick Hallum today — “The Monument” — a strange little interlude excerpted from the forthcoming novel “Wilderness of Mirrors.” After 9-11, the NSA sends Peter Fisher to the Iraqi desert with a Stryker brigade to investigate a strange phenomenon that may turn the tide of the battle to free Iraq. In the horrific aftermath of his secret mission, Peter recalls his youthful collaboration with powers he barely understands and that influence his life for decades to come. Read THE MONUMENT here >>  Please like &...

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October fun – a chilling story

Posted by on Oct 6, 2014 in books, publishing, writing | 0 comments

For the month of October, my alter-ego Nicholas Hallum (who writes horror and strange horror-inflected SF) created a chilling  tale designed to keep you up at night. This is also my first experiment with Kindle PRE-ORDER. The NEW 20-page story “SANCTUARY” will appear on October 25. But if you put in a Pre-Order today, the story will jump to the top of the horror list on that release day. Think you can help make that happen? Pre-Order this eerie little gem of a story, and let’s do this together! Here’s the cover to get you excited. ((Ok, you’ll pardon me, I need to go finish revisions on this story…. hope something creepy doesn’t get me before the story hits deadline!)  Please like &...

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The Forest for the Trees — Writers and Authors United

Posted by on Oct 1, 2014 in amwriting, books, reading, writing | 0 comments

I have a publisher. I like my publisher, although they are smaller than the Big 5 publishers. We get along pretty well, and I’ve appreciated their work on my novel Sinful Folk, which has received great publicity from my publisher’s marketing department. I’ve also self-published other material under the name Nicholas Hallum, and I’ve enjoyed that experience of working on material that I entirely control. However, in this era of increasing chaos and change in publishing, it’s interesting to see some people — like publishing veterans Mike Shatzkin and Aaron Shepherd — fundamentally misunderstand the mind-set of the many authors (both traditionally published and indie-published) who signed the largest petition ever signed by a single group of authors (8,000 and still counting). Fundamentally, I think most authors see themselves as a group united in their obectives of A) Making a living at writing, B) Telling a story to interested readers. The world that currently exists in publishing — mostly comprised of the Big 5 — is enormously unfair to authors and is antithetical to both of the stated goals above. Authors who some see as “attacking” publishers are asking for the rights of all authors — as a profession — to accomplish their goals. Authors as a group — a profession — are finally feeling their power and are trending toward a unity against contracts and policies that will hinder their shared goals as a profession. If you are a plumber, you tend to like things good for plumbers as a profession. The same is true for writers. If you are a writer, you’ll tend to like the self-publishing clarity of monthly payments, control over rights, etc. — those writers who don’t like those things will be perceived as “scabs.” That’s exactly the position Authors United is putting itself in right now. Marc Cabot recently posted a precisely appropriate quote about the recent uproar: “There has grown up in the minds of certain groups in this country the notion that because a man or corporation has made a profit out of the public for a number of years, the government and the courts are charged with the duty of guaranteeing such profit in the future, even in the face of changing circumstances and contrary to public interest. This strange doctrine is not supported by statute or common law. Neither individuals nor corporations have any right to come into court and ask that the clock of history be stopped, or turned back.” — Robert A. Heinlein, Life-Line (1939) A literary update from NedNote.com Readers can find my books at these bookstores: To read more of my writing, you can visit NedNote.com. Get literary updates by subscribing to my quarterly newsletter:  Please like &...

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Amazon finally hits back

Posted by on Aug 9, 2014 in books, context awareness, publishing, reading | 0 comments

Dear KDP Author, Just ahead of World War II, there was a radical invention that shook the foundations of book publishing. It was the paperback book. This was a time when movie tickets cost 10 or 20 cents, and books cost $2.50. The new paperback cost 25 cents – it was ten times cheaper. Readers loved the paperback and millions of copies were sold in just the first year. With it being so inexpensive and with so many more people able to afford to buy and read books, you would think the literary establishment of the day would have celebrated the invention of the paperback, yes? Nope. Instead, they dug in and circled the wagons. They believed low cost paperbacks would destroy literary culture and harm the industry (not to mention their own bank accounts). Many bookstores refused to stock them, and the early paperback publishers had to use unconventional methods of distribution – places like newsstands and drugstores. The famous author George Orwell came out publicly and said about the new paperback format, if “publishers had any sense, they would combine against them and suppress them.” Yes, George Orwell was suggesting collusion. Well… history doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme. Fast forward to today, and it’s the e-book’s turn to be opposed by the literary establishment. Amazon and Hachette – a big US publisher and part of a $10 billion media conglomerate – are in the middle of a business dispute about e-books. We want lower e-book prices. Hachette does not. Many e-books are being released at $14.99 and even $19.99. That is unjustifiably high for an e-book. With an e-book, there’s no printing, no over-printing, no need to forecast, no returns, no lost sales due to out of stock, no warehousing costs, no transportation costs, and there is no secondary market – e-books cannot be resold as used books. E-books can and should be less expensive. Perhaps channeling Orwell’s decades old suggestion, Hachette has already been caught illegally colluding with its competitors to raise e-book prices. So far those parties have paid $166 million in penalties and restitution. Colluding with its competitors to raise prices wasn’t only illegal, it was also highly disrespectful to Hachette’s readers. The fact is many established incumbents in the industry have taken the position that lower e-book prices will “devalue books” and hurt “Arts and Letters.” They’re wrong. Just as paperbacks did not destroy book culture despite being ten times cheaper, neither will e-books. On the contrary, paperbacks ended up rejuvenating the book industry and making it stronger. The same will happen with e-books. Many inside the echo-chamber of the industry often draw the box too small. They think books only compete against books. But in reality, books compete against mobile games, television, movies, Facebook, blogs, free news sites and more. If we want a healthy reading culture, we have to work hard to be sure books actually are competitive against these other media types, and a big part of that is working hard to make books less expensive. Moreover, e-books are highly price elastic. This means that when the price goes down, customers buy much more. We’ve quantified the price elasticity of e-books from repeated measurements across many titles. For every copy an e-book would sell at $14.99, it would...

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