New Sterling GM for SureID

I’m a startup guy. In 2012, I had the opportunity to do another startup. I was talking to venture capitalists and seed partners about funding my next new idea. I won’t go into too many details about the concept and the tech now, but it has been ironically satisfying to see the basic kernel of my idea become a Black Mirror episode. In other words, my idea was viable enough to be conceptualized as one future possible and showcased on a popular TV show, seven years after I first conceived of it, and put the pieces in place to build the tech. It’s weirdly satisfying, and also terrifying to see the Black Mirror version of my intended future. At that time, I also had in play an offer from a great team led by Peter Biddle at Intel, to come join them and deliver a new...

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Leaving Intel

*A note that I sent my team at Intel today, after nearly seven years of great work together READ an update to this post with details about my new role at Sterling as GM for SureID >>  Team – I’m leaving Intel. It’s bittersweet because we’ve done so many amazing things together, but I have an opportunity I simply can’t turn down in the startup space. I’m leaving to become GM/CEO of a company in the biometrics authentication space. I’ve been at Intel for nearly 7 years and I deeply appreciate the camaraderie and professionalism of all the people at Intel. It’s just time for me to move on, so I can keep learning and growing. Favorite memories at Intel include getting OpenVINO out the door at Embedded Vision this year to great acclaim, shepherding the GPA team...

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Google I/O Day Zero 2018

I love going to developer shows and talking to software engineers about the toolsets our teams develop at Intel. For me, since I spend so much of my time in meetings and planning sessions, it is a refreshing opportunity to re-engage with the actual use cases and the actual developer customers who use our tools. Last week, I took 5 engineering teams to Google I/O Intel Day Zero in Santa Clara. Since I don’t often get a chance to spend 4-5 hours uninterrupted seeing my great engineering team members in action, I also welcome the time to spend hands-on with our technical tools, learning the most recent innovations from the people who actually write the code and debug the software. This is “developers only” — so no marketing, no strategy, no...

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Explainer: Autonomous and Semi-autonomous Vehicles

You’ve heard of autonomous vehicles — cars that can drive themselves. But what you may not know is that there are actually multiple levels of possible autonomy, and we’re living with some of those early levels now with newer vehicles that includes advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). These systems help with safety and comfortable driving. The potential systems grow in complexity and autonomy from there: the Society of Automotive Engineers defines six levels of automotive automation, explained here: Level 0: No Automation — Zero autonomy; the driver performs all the driving, but the vehicle can aid with blind spot detection, forward collision warnings, and lane departure warnings. Level 1: Driver Assistance — The vehicle may have some...

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New Patent: Cross-Geo Calendar

Good ideas are quick and easy to create. However, it gets complicated if you want to keep your idea as your own, and if you want to make money from your idea. If you wish to protect your good idea from other people using it without your permission, it’s wise to protect it by formalizing your idea as an “intellectual property” (I.P.). Books, movies, songs and software code can be protected. One great way of keeping your idea protected is to keep it secret. If you never reveal what’s inside your secret box, it’s pretty hard for people to steal it! Examples of this kind of I.P. protection include the exact mix of the Kentucky Fried chicken batter, and the ingredients for Coca-Cola. A trade secret is proprietary — that’s kind...

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Runcible – Monohm at MWC 2015

Runcible – Monohm at MWC 2015

I am so impressed with the craftsmanship and creativity shown by the Monohm team with their new “heirloom device,” the Runcible. Even in the first generation of this smartphone, the device no longer feels like a technological interloper on your life. Instead it feels like a natural part of your daily wardrobe, part of your life, and part of your family experience. This is what a “next generation wearable device” should feel like: it should be organic and beautiful. The Runcible device is a round smartphone that fits readily in your pocket, is crafted with care (both software and hardware), and delivers a personalized experience that does not interrupt your life, but instead accentuates what you really care about in your daily experience. I...

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