State of Identity – Ned Hayes Interview

Episode 107 Risk and Compliance Bridging the Physical/Digital Divide with Ned Hayes of SureID February 14, 2019 Join SureID General Manager Ned Hayes as he shares how SureID is bringing FBI-approved background checks to nearly 1,000 locations nationwide with military-grade biometric capture technology.   https://content.blubrry.com/stateofidentity/SOI_2019_02_14_SureID.mp3 Please like &...

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Taking ethical action in identity: 5 steps for better biometrics

| Published in Help Net Security this week: Taking Ethical Action in Identity – 5 Steps Towards Better Biometrics   Glance at your phone. Tap a screen. Secure access granted! This is the power of biometric identity at work. The convenience of unlocking your phone with a fingertip or your face is undeniable. But ethical issues abound in the biometrics field. The film Minority Report demonstrated one possible future, in terms of precise advertising targeting based on a face. But the Spielberg film also demonstrated some of the downsides of biometrics – the stunning lack of privacy and consumer protection. What’s fascinating is that many of these concerns were anticipated over a century ago. In 1890, Louis Brandeis advocated privacy protection when he...

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Context Sensing in the Wild – New Proximity Awareness on Dell Laptops

My team at Intel spent the last few years working on this great new Context Sensing awareness system that will be announced on new Dell laptops at CES 2019. Congratulations to the Context team at Intel!  Dell’s new Latitude laptop can detect your presence and wake itself — Your laptop might already use your face to sign in, but Dell is taking it one step further. Ahead of CES 2019, the computer manufacturer has unveiled an updated version of its commercial 2-in-1, the Latitude 7400. These enterprise devices don’t usually come with the most exciting technologies, but this one is different. The new Latitude 7400 device comes equipped with a feature that can actually sense your presence and use Windows Hello to log you in. Dell calls the feature...

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The Biometric Threat – Some Preventative Measures

|New post published by Technica Curiosa. Complete article here >> We live in an age where personal information is difficult to protect, and passwords are far from unbreakable. Recently, IBM surveyed nearly 4,000 people and learned that 67% are comfortable using biometrics, and 87% would be comfortable using biometric authentication in the future. Millennials are particularly comfortable with biometric security, with 75% reporting that they’re at ease with today’s technology. In fact, if you used a fingertip scan to log into your phone to read this article, you just used biometrics to verify your identity. From passwords to PINs to tokens, there are many ways we provide credentials, but no method has grown in popularity more than biometrics. Biometrics have...

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Google I/O Day Zero

I love going to developer shows and talking to software engineers about the toolsets our teams develop at Intel. For me, since I spend so much of my time in meetings and planning sessions, it is a refreshing opportunity to re-engage with the actual use cases and the actual developer customers who use our tools. Last week, I took 5 engineering teams to Google I/O Intel Day Zero in Santa Clara. Since I don’t often get a chance to spend 4-5 hours uninterrupted seeing my great engineering team members in action, I also welcome the time to spend hands-on with our technical tools, learning the most recent innovations from the people who actually write the code and debug the software. This is “developers only” — so no marketing, no...

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New Patent: Cross-Geo Calendar

Good ideas are quick and easy to create. However, it gets complicated if you want to keep your idea as your own, and if you want to make money from your idea. If you wish to protect your good idea from other people using it without your permission, it’s wise to protect it by formalizing your idea as an “intellectual property” (I.P.). Books, movies, songs and software code can be protected. One great way of keeping your idea protected is to keep it secret. If you never reveal what’s inside your secret box, it’s pretty hard for people to steal it! Examples of this kind of I.P. protection include the exact mix of the Kentucky Fried chicken batter, and the ingredients for Coca-Cola. A trade secret is proprietary — that’s kind...

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