How to be Smarter about Biometrics

| Article in Cyber Defense Magazine, January 2019 — Ned Hayes, General Manager, SureID Facial recognition, one of the most popular methods of biometric enrollment and customized marketing, will bring us to ultra-surveillance, targeted assassinations and Black Mirror-style oversight. At least, this is what critics of the technology would have you believe. Yet we don’t see such dystopian outcomes in commercial authentication and identity verification today. So why are these critics so concerned, and what can security professionals do to alleviate their concerns? By 2024, the market for facial recognition applications and related biometric functions is expected to grow at a 20% compounded rate to almost $15.4 billion. Already, almost 245 million video...

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The Biometric Threat – Some Preventative Measures

|New post published by Technica Curiosa. Complete article here >> We live in an age where personal information is difficult to protect, and passwords are far from unbreakable. Recently, IBM surveyed nearly 4,000 people and learned that 67% are comfortable using biometrics, and 87% would be comfortable using biometric authentication in the future. Millennials are particularly comfortable with biometric security, with 75% reporting that they’re at ease with today’s technology. In fact, if you used a fingertip scan to log into your phone to read this article, you just used biometrics to verify your identity. From passwords to PINs to tokens, there are many ways we provide credentials, but no method has grown in popularity more than biometrics. Biometrics have...

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New Commemorative Edition of The Eagle Tree

I’m excited to announce that Steve Silberman, friend of Oliver Sacks, winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction, and author of the New York Times bestselling history of autism Neurotribes, has written a lovely heartfelt foreword for the new hardcover commemorative edition of The Eagle Tree. FOREWORD by Steve Silberman It is the special, magical quality of some precious books that they seem to contain the whole universe in miniature. Ned Hayes’s The Eagle Tree is such a book. By fully inhabiting the subjective experience of his narrator—Peter March Wong, an insatiably curious autistic teenager in Washington State with an unruly passion for climbing trees—Hayes brings vast worlds into focus, from the intricate web of interspecies...

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Launch to Exit: The Oly Arts Success Story

|Founder of local multi-platform publication group successfully sells off publication unit to local entrepreneur >> Coverage included: The Olympian: Founder Sells to Local Marketing LeaderSound Sound Business: Oly Arts Bought by Local Publisher OLY ARTS, the three-year-old multiplatform publication focused on arts and cultural events in Thurston County and surrounding regions, announced today that the publication has signed an acquisition agreement with local media expert Billy Thomas, who currently serves as the publication’s associate publisher. In an equity-only transaction valued at $350,000, Mr. Thomas will become the publication’s owner and primary publisher and will take over all daily operations for all OLY ARTS media properties in October 2018. “I am...

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Washington Post Interview

In summer 2018, I was contacted by a reporter from the Washington Post, who wanted to write an article about my hometown. I’m the founder and publisher of the leading regional arts and culture publication OLY ARTS, so I was happy to lend my expertise to her story. We ended up spending some time together in Olympia as I showed her the sites, introduced her to local business owners and demonstrated the goodwill that is part and parcel of the Pacific Northwest experience. It was a nice surprise to see myself quoted in the eventual story in the Washington Post, which appeared in September 2018. Here are some brief excerpts: In the Pacific Northwest, a capital city that long has marched to the beat of its own drum manages to maintain its groove amid plenty of...

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