BookList Review

Good news on the book front… novel SINFUL FOLK reviewed in 100-year-old BOOKLIST — the magazine the New York Times calls “an acquisitions bible for public and school librarians nationwide.” From Booklist   *Starred Review*   “In December of 1377, five children are burned in a suspicious house fire. Awash in paranoia and prejudice, the fathers suspect it is the work of Jews and set out to seek justice from the king, loading the charred bodies of their boys onto a cart. Unbeknownst to them, among them is a woman, Mear, who has been hiding out in the town for the past 10 years posing as a mute man. It is a treacherous journey, for their rations are spare and the weather is brutal. And always, they are haunted by the question,...

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HNR Review: “Riveting, poetic story… a rich medieval tapestry”

Great Review of Sinful Folk from the Historical Novel Reviews . Print edition #68 HNR (Historical Novel Society) “Riveting, poetic story . . .  a rich medieval tapestry . . .  medieval fans will like this.” England, 1377. Mear has been disguising herself as a man for almost ten years, raising her son and helping out at the smithy. Then her child and four other boys are killed in a mysterious fire. Mear sets out with other men from their remote village to take the five boys’ corpses to London to seek the king’s justice. Their trek is filled with hardships and revelations as Mear’s life-threatening secrets are unveiled and she finds bittersweet redemption at the end of the journey. This riveting, poetic story puts Mear and her companions through a...

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Telling a Story

Written as a participant in the Rainier Writing Workshop, 2014  What does it mean to tell a story? When I think of “telling a story,” I am thinking specifically of the act of verbal storytelling – perhaps around a fire with an audience of people who can leave at any moment. In this situation of verbal storytelling, it’s important to keep your listeners in anticipation of what might come next. It is also helpful to inform them about the world of your story. And to tell them about the kind of story you are telling, and to fulfill that kind of explanation. Digressions that explain the storyteller’s apprehension of what is to come are most welcome, as such pieces of the “story” build towards satisfying narrative and powerful insights into the characters. On the other...

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The Writing Process

I was invited by Steven Hendricks (author of Little Is Left to Tell) to participate in a “writing process blog tour.” Thanks, Steve! Each person on the tour tags three others to answer questions about creative work and their writing process. My process comments are below. I’ve tagged the following writers: author of paranormal fiction Mark Henry (Random House), historical novelist Jan Moran (St. Martin), and perennial historical romance best-selling author Kathryn Le Veque. My WRITING PROCESS.  1. What am I working on? I am currently working on three different fictional works, in various stages of the process for each. First, and top of mind for me right now is a new book in a new genre for me — a work of fantastic/weird fiction that is essentially a...

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